Nokia admits Lumia 800 battery problems

peoples-phone-nokia-lumia-800

Nokia has acknowledged there is a serious battery drainage issue with its recently launched Lumia 800 smartphone and has promised to rollout a software update to resolve it soon.

The Lumia 800, which was widely touted for its battery saving capabilities at the time of unveiling turned out to be anything but after customer complaints begun flooding in that the handset was losing power too quickly. After admitting that something is definitely awry, Finnish giant has now released an official statement on the Nokia discussion boards explaining the cause of the problem, which it says is software related and can therefore be patched up without a hardware recall.

“On Monday 12th December some of our customers started to comment in various social media that the preloaded diagnostics tool in some of the Nokia Lumia 800 phones was showing lower battery capacity than expected. We immediately started to investigate these reports and can now confirm that while the battery itself is fine, a software problem on certain variants is limiting the phone’s ability to access the full battery capacity.”

Nokia added: “The good news is that as this is a software problem it can be easily resolved. The planned software update in early 2012, as well as including many performance enhancements, will also include a fix that will enable the affected phones to access the total battery capacity.”

The phone maker has already released one update earlier this month to handle power management issues and said there is a second in the pipeline, which we’re is assuming is the same as the aforementioned.

Although the majority of early adopters are reported to be unaffected, the whole saga will doubtless have adversely affected what many consider Nokia’s make or break smartphone since its landmark deal with Microsoft to switch to Windows Phone as its primary platform. With sales forecast reduced by analysts from two million to just 800,000 for the current quarter by analysts, Espoo will need to act fast to turn its ailing smartphone fortunes around.

 

 

 

  Compare all deals on Nokia here.

 

BT sues Google over Android patent violations

peoples-phone-bt-logo

British Telecom has filed a lawsuit against Google over alleged infringements of its patents on the Android operating system.

BT claims at least six of its patents are violated on Google Maps, Google Music, Android Market and other location-based products on Android, and is seeking damages – including triple damages for wilful and deliberate infringement, as well as an injunction.

Legal proceedings may also expand to Europe, which, if successful, could result in BT receiving royalties for each Android device already in use and being sold, of which there are more than 500,000 activated per day by Google’s own admission.

A spokesperson for BT told The Guardian: “BT can confirm that it has commenced legal proceedings against Google by filing a claim with the US District Court of Delaware for patent infringement.

“The patents in question relate to technologies which underpin location-based services, navigation and guidance information and personalised access to services and content. BT’s constant investment in innovation has seen it develop a large portfolio of patents which are valuable corporate assets.”

The telecoms provider is of course not the first company to accuse the Mountain View, California-based giant of such wrongdoings, which has already faced legal action from the likes of Apple, Microsoft, Oracle and eBay.

Florian Müller of FOSS Patents, says: “Android already had more than enough intellectual problems anyway. Now Google faces one more large organisation that believes its rights are infringed. BT probably wants to continue to be able to do business with all mobile device makers and therefore decided to sue Google itself.”

It’s unclear at this point whether Google’s acquisition of Motorola Mobility will play a part in deciding its fate in the litigations as Motorola is known to have cross-licensing deals with major players in the industry and has a substantial patents portfolio of its own.

However, clearly BT does not believe Google has anything in this case to defend itself, let alone fight back with. It’s still early days, though, so we won’t know the full details of matters just yet. Stay tuned as we find out more.

 

 

 

 

 

First homes in Jersey to be offered fibre broadband

About 500 homes in Jersey will be given access to fibre optic broadband at no cost as part of a trial of the new network.
 
About 500 homes in Jersey will be given access to fibre optic broadband at no cost as part of a trial of the new network.
 
The States of Jersey invested £19m in JTs island-wide fibre optic network which it expects to be available to the whole island by 2016. The trial will start on 3 January at La Moye, La Rocque and Fauvic and will last for three months. The trial is open to customers of all telecom operators in Jersey. A JT spokesperson said it was a trial of the network and so JT, Sure and Newtel would be writing to their customers in that area offering them the chance to trial fibre optic broadband.
 
JT say speeds will vary between 40Mbps and 1Gbps during the trial. People trying the service will be expected to give detailed feedback covering everything from installation to the experience of having faster broadband.
 
JT said it would use the feedback to help shape the final product it offers to the public when the service is launched. The service will be available to all homes in the island by 2016, but the first homes will have access to the service by 2012, with most being switched to fibre optic broadband by 2013.
 
Graeme Millar, chief executive of JT, said: “Clearly it takes time to replace the island-wide copper cable network, and we nee to do that in stages to minimise disruption and gain appropriate access to the 42,000 homes. “
 
Mr Millar said the switchover to a fibre optic network enabling broadband speeds of up to 1Gbps would make it “the fastest for a residential network in the western world”.
 
 

 
 

Keep in touch……it will only cost you £65,000

peoples-phone-broadband-internet

 

The cost of keeping in touch can quickly add up. In fact, according to phone, mobile and broadband provider TalkTalk we’ll spend a whopping £65,564.94 on average keeping in touch with friends and family during our lifetime.

With the costs of communicating in the 21st Century covering calls and texts, line rental, data roaming charges, buying and replacing handsets, insurance, accessories and broadband subscription, we now spend almost as much on communication as we do on gas, water and electricity combined.

In a typical lifetime each of us will spend £16,235 on mobile bills, followed closely by home broadband at £12,414 and then the cost of our fixed line rental £11,228. As adults, we will also spend around £5,000 on average replacing our handsets for newer models, with each of us spending around £970 on average each year on communicating with friends, family and colleagues.

TalkTalk’s research marks the introduction of its Value Line Rental package which allows phone and broadband customers to pay a one-off payment of £114 for one year’s line rental, which equates to just £9.50 a month, cheaper than BT, Sky and Virgin Media, offering savings of over £50 a year for customers.
 
Tristia Clarke, Commercial Director at TalkTalk said, “Communication is one of the most basic human needs but the cost of staying in touch is significant. We know keeping in touch with friends and family is really important for our customers, but we also know these costs can add up, which is why we’re doing everything we can to bring the cost of communication down”.

Talk Talk’s research into the costs of staying connected revealed a number of additional findings, which paint an illuminating picture of how our society is communicating in the 21st Century:

Men spend 5% more on average than women during their lifetime
 
Northerners spend 2% less on average than southerners

People with children will spend on average 7% more than those without

Londoners will spend the most on communicating in their lifetime – 30% more than people in Yorkshire & Humberside, who will spend the lowest

 

 

Check the latest TalkTalk broadband deals here.

 

 

 

Keep in touch……it will only cost you £65,000

TalkTalk reveals the lifetime cost of staying in touch with friends and family. The cost of keeping in touch can quickly add up. In fact, according to phone, mobile and broadband provider TalkTalk we’ll spend a whopping £65,564.94 on average keeping in touch with friends and family during our lifetime.
 
TalkTalk reveals the lifetime cost of staying in touch with friends and family. The cost of keeping in touch can quickly add up. In fact, according to phone, mobile and broadband provider TalkTalk we’ll spend a whopping £65,564.94 on average keeping in touch with friends and family during our lifetime.
 
With the costs of communicating in the 21st Century covering calls and texts, line rental, data roaming charges, buying and replacing handsets, insurance, accessories and broadband subscription, we now spend almost as much on communication as we do on gas, water and electricity combined1.
 
In a typical lifetime each of us will spend £16,235 on mobile bills, followed closely by home broadband at £12,414 and then the cost of our fixed line rental £11,228. As adults, we will also spend around £5,000 on average replacing our handsets for newer models, with each of us spending around £970 on average each year on communicating with friends, family and colleagues.
 
TalkTalk’s research marks the introduction of its Value Line Rental package which allows phone and broadband customers to pay a one-off payment of £114 for one year’s line rental, which equates to just £9.50 a month, cheaper than BT, Sky and Virgin Media, offering savings of over £50 a year for customers.
 
Tristia Clarke, Commercial Director at TalkTalk said, “Communication is one of the most basic human needs but the cost of staying in touch is significant. We know keeping in touch with friends and family is really important for our customers, but we also know these costs can add up, which is why we’re doing everything we can to bring the cost of communication down”.
 
Talk Talk’s research into the costs of staying connected revealed a number of additional findings, which paint an illuminating picture of how our society is communicating in the 21st Century: Men spend 5% more on average than women during their lifetime, Northerners spend 2% less on average than southerners, People with children will spend on average 7% more than those without, Londoners will spend the most on communicating in their lifetime – 30% more than people in Yorkshire & Humberside, who will spend the lowest.
 
 
 

Smartphone apps nearing 1m across all platforms

peoples-phone-apps

The number of smartphone applications available across all platforms is closing in on one million, as the post-iPhone app explosion continues unabated.

According to research conducted by analysis company Mobilewalla, titles for Apple iOS-powered devices, Android kits, Windows Phone handsets and BlackBerrys now number some 989,863.

Unsurprisingly the lion’s share of these are for iGadgets, with some 590,138 of the total – and counting, presumably.

Android is in second, with 320,315, while BlackBerry users get to choose from 43,544. And bringing up the rear is relative newbie Windws Phone with 35,479.

Of the total, some 16.68 per cent are entertainment-focussed, while 13.36 per cent are games. Books and lifestyle-flavoured titles made up 10.21 per cent and 8.2 per cent respectively.

Commenting on the figures, Anindya Datta, Mobilewalla founder, said: “This is truly an astonishing accomplishment that cannot be ignored.

“The growth of apps is the fastest growing consumer segment in the history of commerce.”

Datta also noted the paradigm shift in apps since they first entered the public’s consciousness back in 2007 that has seen them become ever slicker, and the seismic effect of casual gaming behemoths such as Angry Birds that sparked even more devs to join the app gold rush.

He said: “In the early days most of the initial apps were ‘fun, indie’ apps, such as the Doodle Jump game, one of the first mass-market apps to gain viral popularity and paved the entryway for other mass successes like Angry Birds.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

iPhone goes up in flames for second time

peoples-phone-apple-iphone-4-back

Another iPhone has spontaneously combusted, following news last week that one of Apple’s costly handsets had gone all ‘Human Torch’ on its owner during an Australian flight.

According to Mashable, a Brazilian iPhone user’s handset overheated while charging overnight, emitting sparks and flames just 15cm from their face.

Luckily, they emerged unscathed – albeit some $900 poorer thanks to the extortionate cost of iPhones in the land of Samba. Luckier still for Apple, there’s nary a hint of a lawsuit yet.

News of further problems with an Apple handset come after reports of an iPhone – either an iPhone 4S or 4 – exploding during a Regional Express flight LZ319 from Lismore to Sydney.

The damage to the handset was so severe and the heat so intense that the rear glass shattered and the middle right portion melted like butter on hot toast.

Apple has yet to comment on either case something that won’t surprise seasoned watchers of the taciturn types that people its PR wing. But we’re sure to know more once we get a statement from the Australian Transport Safety Bureau.