Making calls has become fifth most frequent use for a Smartphone

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On average, smartphone owners now spend over 2 hours a day using their phones, according to O2’s “All About You” Report into the way customers are using their handsets. However, the research found that making calls comes just fifth in a ranking of things they are used for.

Smartphone users spend more time browsing the internet (25 minutes a day), social networking (17 minutes a day), playing games (13 minutes a day) and listening to music (16 minutes a day) than they do making calls (12 minutes).

David Johnson, General Manager Devices for O2 in the UK, said: “Smartphones are now being used like a digital ‘Swiss Army Knife’, replacing possessions like watches, cameras, books and even laptops. While we’re seeing no let-up in the number of calls customers make or the amount of time they spend speaking on their phones, their phone now plays a far greater role in all aspects of their lives.”

The “All About You” report was commissioned by O2 to mark the launch of the Samsung Galaxy SIII, which is one of the first phones to lavish more attention on these previously “next generation” functions and to be designed for a new generation of smartphone users.

It also found that, for many people, the smartphone is replacing other possessions including alarm clocks, watches, cameras, diaries and even laptops and TVs as they become more intuitive and easier to use for things “beyond calls”.

The phone has also started to replace a range of other possessions:

Over half (54%) say they use their phones in place of an alarm clock

Almost half (46%) have dispensed with a watch in favour of using their smartphone

Two-in-five (39%) have switched to use their phone instead of a separate camera

Over one quarter use their phone instead of a laptop (28%)

One in ten have got shot of a games console in favour of their handset (11%)

Perhaps indicative of where things are moving, one in twenty smartphone users have switched to use their phone in place of a TV (6%) or reading physical books (6%)

O2 has seen a rise in demand for phones that behave more like devices that know, understand and respond to their users. Phones like the latest Samsung Galaxy SIII are the most recent example. It includes voice interaction (the phone will “snooze” if a user asks it to when the alarm goes off), new interfaces such as eye tracking (which mean that the screen won’t go dark when a user is looking at it) and more sophisticated and personalised touchscreen functions are the latest innovations handset makers have developed in response to consumer demand.

Johnson continued: “We’re starting to see more and more phones being developed that interact with their users in new and interesting ways. Intelligent voice recognition and eye tracking are making phones even easier to use and we know our customers will love them.”

 

Check the availability and latest deals for o2 here

 

 

 

 

999 celebrates its 75th birthday

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BT’s 999 emergency service – which handles more than five million calls a year across the capital – celebrates its 75th anniversary tomorrow (Sat).

The world’s first emergency call service was launched following the tragic deaths of five women in a fire in London. More than 1,000 calls were made during the first week of the service in 1937, compared with a weekly average today of 597,000 across the UK and 96,000 in the capital.

BT operators now answer within five seconds 98 per cent of the 31 million UK calls received annually.

The diamond anniversary is being celebrated at BT centres in many parts of the UK.

Chet Patel, BT’s regional director for London, said: “Today, the 999 service is known for its reliability and professionalism. It’s not only the world’s oldest emergency call service having clocked up 75 years of experience in providing the UK with a communications lifeline in times of need, it’s also one of the world’s most respected and admired services.

“Many people in London owe their lives to smooth and effective emergency call handling by BT operators, using the latest technologies to ensure that emergency calls are dealt with swiftly and efficiently. When lives are at stake it’s vital that no time is lost.

“Our 999 operators are the first port of call for people seeking help and we’re very proud of the part they have played in this essential service for the past seven and a half decades.”

Meanwhile, BT is continuing to invest in the service – £10 million is currently being spent on renewing call-handling equipment. New operators undergo a nine-week training programme and all operators are given ‘refresher training’ every month.

Around half of the 80,000-plus calls received daily by BT operators in the UK do not involve requests for help. Most are made by children playing or customers accidentally dialling 999 or the European emergency number 112 from a mobile handset in a pocket or handbag. All have to be carefully managed by BT and the police to ensure genuine calls are dealt with effectively.

Each of the five million calls generated each year in London is handled by one of BT’s well-established 999 centres in Nottingham, Newport, Blackburn, Bangor and Glasgow, or one of the newer centres in Dundee and Portadown, which only recently began taking calls. A centre in Liverpool provides a text relay service for people who are deaf or speech-impaired.

Speed and accuracy of information are vital in the handling of an emergency call. As the call is received details of the caller’s address and phone number flash immediately on the screen of the BT operator, who will swiftly confirm that the call is bona fide, which emergency service is required and then transfer the call to the appropriate service.

When BT operators pass calls to the emergency services, 52 per cent go to the police, 41 per cent to the ambulance service, six per cent to the fire and rescue service and one per cent to the coastguard and cave and mountain rescue services.

999 Quick facts

999 was introduced on June 30, 1937, after five women died in a fire in Wimpole Street, London.

The first call was made in Hampstead days after the service launched and led to burglar Thomas Duffy, 24, being caught red handed.

Emergency callers can be connected to four services – police, ambulance, fire, and coastguard, with calls to cave or mountain rescue directed through the police.

In 1937 operators had to cope with red lamps turning on and a loud klaxon. There were fears that the noise would cause nervous strain on both day and night telephonists.

A 999 call is answered immediately and has priority over other operator calls.

More than half of callers ask to be put through to the police.

All calls are automatically and securely recorded.

Operators handle around 250 calls a day and spend around nine weeks in initial training and coaching.

There are around 85,000 calls each day, with higher volumes over the weekend days.

Experts chose 999 rather than 111 for technical reasons. Wires moving together in the wind can be transmitted as the equivalent of a 111 call.

The first mobile call to 999 was in 1986.

112 was introduced to the UK in 1993. The European number works alongside 999 in line with a European Directive.

Some of the highest call volumes occur around midnight – around 5,000 calls per hour on Friday and Saturday nights. In early hours of New Year’s Day it can reach up to 13,500 calls per hour!

Mobile phone calls make up 62 per cent of all 999s answered by BT.

Other emergency service numbers around the world
000 Australia
111 New Zealand
123 Columbia
100 Greece and Israel
101 Argentina
911 USA and Canada
112 Throughout European Community and alongside national codes

 

History of the 999 Emergency Service

Before the introduction of 999:

People with a telephone in their home, private subscribers, on an automated exchange would call 0 for the operator to contact the emergency services just as they would to make a regular call. If people did not have a dial, a manual exchange, they would tap the telephone cradle to attract the operators attention.

From a public kiosk the special ’emergency call’ button would be pressed so no money would need to be entered to secure the connection.

1882 The Exchange Telegraph Company introduces fire alarm call points in London. A lever is pulled in a dedicated street post to alert the local fire service. The idea is extended by other telegraph companies and in other towns.

1930s Police call points are introduced along similar lines to fire alarm call points but using telephone rather than telegraph technology.

1935 In November a serious fire at the London surgery of aural surgeon Dr Philip Franklin at 27 Wimpole Street W1 (LANgham 1440) caused the death of five women. The inquest heard that the Fire Brigade arrived at the scene before the operator had answered a neighbour’s call to alert them to the fire, and the Belgrave Committee was set up to study the problem of operators’ identifying emergency telephone calls.

The Committee believed that there should be one number throughout the country to alert the emergency services and that the number must be easy to remember. The number had to be three digits long to work in London. It was important that emergency calls could be made from coin box telephones without inserting any money (at the time money had to be inserted before making a call). It was relatively simple and inexpensive to modify call boxes to allow the 9 to be dialled without inserting coins, and the choice of 999 was made.

1937 On 30 June 1937 the 999 service was introduced to 91 automatic telephone exchanges in London. A caller dialling 999 would be connected to the operator in the same way as a regular call, but light and sound signals in the telephone exchange would alert the operator that this was a priority call. If no operator was free to make the call, the operator would break off dealing with a regular call.

In the first week there were 1336 emergency 999 calls (1073 genuine calls; 171 who wanted the operator and 91 ‘alleged practical jokers’) and 1896 emergency calls using the old way of dialling 0.

1938 The 999 service was introduced in Glasgow.

1946 The Second World War (1939-1945) delayed the expansion of the 999 service but the programme continued afterwards with Birmingham, Bristol, Edinburgh, Liverpool, Manchester and Newcastle introducing the 999 service in 1946.

1948 By March 1948 all the larger towns served by automatic exchanges had the 999 service.

1976 All telephone exchanges in Britain are automated, allowing the 999 service to be truly nationwide.

1986 999 service is introduced for mobile phone users (replacing interim arrangements of 995, 996 and 997).

1993 In January 1993 the additional emergency code 112 was introduced alongside 999.

1998 On 6 October 1998 BT launched a new free 999 information service for the emergency services. By automatically forwarding the number and address of the phone from which the 999 call had been made, call handling and vehicle dispatch times could improve by 30 seconds.

2003 BT moves to routing all calls from fixed line by their postcode, which allowed an even closer match with emergency service catchment areas and allowed movement away from all numbers with the same area code being routed in the same way.

2004 In January 2004, BT extends the 999 location information service to allow approximate locations for mobile phones to be automatically provided to the emergency services based on radio coverage of the aerial picking-up the call. The new service is in line with the latest EC Directives on making location information available (Directive 2002/22/EC) and on privacy and data protection (Directive 2002/58/EC).

 

Numbers of calls

In the early 50s, when there were around 4 million customer lines, there were fewer than half a million 999 calls.

By the early 60s, there were around 7 million customer lines; approx 2.5m 999 calls made a year, rising to 4m a year by 1969.

1978 – approx 16 million lines – 9 million 999 calls made – 65% to police, 25% to ambulance, 10% to fire

1988 – approx 23 million BT lines – 19 million 999 calls handled by BT, now including calls from mobile handsets and use of push button phones (rather than dials) increasing numbers of false calls due to children “playing” with handsets

1991 – approx 25m BT lines – 22m 999 calls handled by BT

1994 – approx 26m BT lines – 22m 999 calls handled by BT

1996 – approx 27m BT lines – 20.6m 999 calls handled by BT

1998 – approx 27m BT lines – 19.7m 999 calls handled by BT

2000 – approx 28m BT lines – 24.9m 999 calls handled by BT

2001 – 31.3m 999 calls handled by BT. A massive increase, with approx half made from mobile phones, many being dialled accidentally

2006 – 30 million calls handled by BT, 50% from mobile handsets, with 60% connected to the emergency services (56% to police, 35% ambulance, 8% fire and 1% to coastguard)

2011 – 31 million calls handled by BT, 62% from mobile handsets, with 50% connected to the emergency services (52% to police, 41% ambulance, 6% fire and less than 1% to coastguard)

 

Rollout of 999 across the UK

Introduction dates for regions outside London 1
1 Post Office Telecommunications Journal, May 1949 (Glasgow); all others from ‘Summary – Emergency Call Service ‘999’ Introduction (Works Spec T E 6240 (sect 13)’ manuscript table and later correspondence from regions – File 0801-B

Scotland – 1938 Glasgow

Home Counties – February 1946:
Brighton (13/02/1946); Fakenham (13/02/1946); Reading (13/02/1946);
Chelmsford (13/02/1946); Gt Yarmouth (13/02/1946); Ryde (13/02/1946);
Chichester (13/02/1946); Guildford (13/02/1946); Sevenoaks (13/02/1946)
Cromer (13/02/1946); Hertford (13/02/1946); Southend (13/02/1946);
Dorking (13/02/1946); Kings Lynn (13/02/1946); Slough (13/02/1946);
Epping (13/02/1946); Portsmouth (13/02/1946);

Midlands – February 1946:
Birmingham Director Area (25/02/1946) Coventry (19/02/46)

North Eastern Region – January 1946:
Bridlington (21/01/1946); Middlesboro York (21/01/1946)

North Western Region – May 1945
Liverpool director area – 9 exchanges (30/05/1945) Burnley (5-6/12/1945)
Rochdale (06/12/1045) Macclesfield (09/03/1946); Manchester (09/03/1946)

South Western Region – January 1946:
Cheltenham (-Prestbury) (31/01/1946); Kingsbridge (01/01/1946); Torquay (-Chelston, Churston, Paignton, Preston, St Marychurch, Shiphay Collation) (28/01/1946);
Dursley (31/01/1946); Plymouth (01/01/1946);
Exeter (-Pinhoe, Topsham) (07/01/1946); Swindon (31/01/1946);
Gloucester (-Barnwood) (31/01/1946); Truro (01/01/1946)

Welsh and Border Counties Region – October 1946:
Newport, Monmouthshire (25/10/1946)

Northern Ireland –September 1946:
Ballymena (23/09/1946); Enniskillen (23/09/1946);
Belfast (23/09/1946); Londonderry (23/09/1946)

Typical numbers of 999 calls each week in 1949 were:
London, 3000; Liverpool, 90; Portsmouth, 75; Edinburgh, 70; Cambridge, 25

Typical numbers of 999 calls each week in 1951 were:

London, 4300; Manchester, 150; Birmingham, 640; Leeds, 370; Glasgow, 300; Liverpool, 250; Edinburgh, 150; Brighton, 100; Portsmouth, 90.

 

 

 

UK leads the Wi-fi boom

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The UK is leading the global wi-fi boom, with its existing estate of more than 18 million hotspots set to increase to 21 million by 2015, according to industry experts, Informa Telecoms & Media.

The findings come as the UK wi-fi industry celebrates its tenth anniversary and BT, which was among the first providers to supply wi-fi in Britain, today announcing that its BT Fon and BT Openzone wi-fi services will be rebranded to BT Wi-fi in a move to make it easier for users to find a hotspot and get online.

BT is one of the largest of the world’s wi-fi providers. Its business and consumer broadband customers have free access to one of the world’s biggest wi-fi networks of more than six million hotspots in more than 100 countries. An incredible 21,000 people log on to BT Wi-fi every minute during peak times and more than one billion wi-fi minutes were used over the last three months on BT Wi-fi.

As wireless hotspots grow consumer behaviour is changing, with email accounting for 26 per cent out of home activity, social networking 20 per cent and web browsing 19 per cent. Travel locations are the most popular for accessing the internet with 79 per cent tending to use wi-fi, closely followed by eating and drinking at 71 per cent and 52 per cent when shopping.

The appeal of wi-fi is not limited to the young early technology adopters, 41 per cent of 35-54 year-olds, 31 per cent of over 55s and 29 per cent of 18-34 year-olds say that they understand the benefits of wi-fi.

Wi-fi is also boosting the fortunes of businesses, with 17 per cent of people saying that they would chose a place with wi-fi over one without. Wi-fi also greatly influences people’s propensity for return visits with 21 per cent of people saying that they would visit a place again if it had wi-fi. Wi-fi also boosts businesses opportunities for referrals with 13 per cent of people saying they would recommend somewhere with wi-fi to a friend.

BT Wi-fi CEO, Andy Baker, said: “As tablets and smartphones have become increasingly popular, connecting to the internet through wi-fi has become more relevant. We are proud to offer our customers free access to one of the biggest wi-fi networks in the world and wanted to make it easier for our customers to find a hotspot and get online, it made sense for us to bring our estate under one unified brand.”

Informa Telecoms & Media, Principal Analyst, Thomas Wehmeier, said: “When BT pioneered the introduction of wi-fi in the UK 10 years ago nobody could have imagined just how central to everyday life the technology would eventually become. For today’s connected consumer, wi-fi is an essential way to connect and communicate via an increasing number of smart devices, from the smartphone to the tablet and, in the future, to virtually any consumer electronic device.”

  

 

Checkout the latest deals on BT Infinity super fast broadband here.

ISP’s could be required to snoop for piracy under draft Ofcom proposals

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Your ISP could be required to monitor your web use and send out letters if you’re suspected of illegally downloading copyrighted material, according to draft proposals published by Ofcom today.

ISPs with more than 400,000 subscribers would be asked to sign up the code, with BT, Everything Everywhere (Orange Home Broadband), O2, Sky, TalkTalk and Virgin Media mooted to sign up.

The key proposals of the code will see letters sent out to subscribers suspected of infringement, with a ‘three-strikes’ policy adopted:

“If a customer receives three letters or more within a 12-month period, anonymous information may be provided on request to copyright owners showing them which infringement reports are linked to that customer’s account,” the report says.

The copyright owner(s) may then seek a court order requiring the ISP to reveal the identity of the customer, making them liable for prosecution under the Copyright Designs and Patent Act 1988.

Wrongfully sent a letter? You’ve got 20 days to appeal

Under the new proposals, you’d have 20 days to appeal a decision if you’re served a letter. So if you think that someone has accessed your network without your permission you can appeal.

ISPs would also be required to include in their letters the number of copyright infringement reports connected to their account.

Details of the appeal process are expected to emerge as Ofcom works on a “publicly-available standard to help promote good practice in evidence gathering,” for copyright holders investigating subscribers suspected of file sharing.

Until more information on the code emerges from Ofcom we really don’t have much else to go on right now. Ofcom says that these providers account for more than 93 per cent of the retail broadband market in the UK. The remaining 7 per cent can breathe easy for now, but it may be a matter of time before all UK ISPs are required to adopt this code.

 

 

 

Check out the latest and best broadband deals here.

 

2 million Brits stung with unexpected data charges on their broadband bills

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More than two million Brits are being stung with extra charges despite signing up to seemingly good value broadband deals. New research from TalkTalk has found that millions of people face extra charges for going over their monthly data allowance, with some being hit with costs of up to £40 on top of their monthly subscription.

This problem is set to get worse with more and more homes watching films and TV over the internet. Ofcom found that British broadband households download an average 17GB per month yet some cheaper broadband packages only permit 10GB of data use over a month.

There can also be serious financial repercussions for going over your allocated data allowance. For example, BT charge £5 per extra 5GB used meaning that the additional costs can quickly multiply.

TalkTalk Commercial Director Tristia Clarke said “Whilst these broadband offers initially look like a good deal we urge customers to read the fine print to check that they are not being charged when they go over these limited data allowances.

“Our TalkTalk Essentials package for example offers unbeatable value and unlimited downloads so you can enjoy as much music, film and TV as you want.”

 

Check the latest TalkTalk broadband deals here.

 

 

 

British Internet users waste enough broadband speed to power YouTube globally

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Over half a million homes are losing around 4Mbps of broadband speed due to poor in home set ups – according to new research released today by home phone, broadband and mobile firm TalkTalk. That’s equivalent to 2.3 million Mb of speed being lost every second. It takes 3.2 Mbps to stream BBC iPlayer in HD which shows just how significant this is.
 
TalkTalk also believes that a further 2.5 million homes could see a smaller – but still significant – increase to their broadband speed just by making some simple changes themselves.
 
The research from TalkTalk shows that over the course of a year British homes will leak 72 billion gigabytes of bandwidth capacity, which is more than enough to power YouTube around the year.

TalkTalk Bright Sparks engineers have carried out 25,000 free home visits to help customers stop their bandwidth leaking.

The most common problems found were:
31% – speed lost through poor wiring
20% – router needed to be set up or reconfigured
17% – phone socket not properly set up
14% – new ADSL broadband filter required
13 % – other problems such as customers not connecting to the router to the master socket

“A bit of basic home maintenance and some re-jigging of the wiring in the living room could speed up internet connections no end,” said, one of TalkTalk’s Bright Sparks engineers.”
Other measures which can reduce broadband waste include plugging routers or modems directly into the master socket and fitting filters to stop other devices connected to your phone line from interfering with your broadband signal.
 
“You can lose anything up to 4 megabits per second of speed simply due to a poor in home set up,” said TalkTalk Bright Sparks engineer Dan Downham. “When you consider that the average home gets a broadband speed of 7.6 megabits per second, that’s an awful lot of bandwidth going to waste.

“The megabits are coming into your home but they’re going to waste before they can be put to good use,” he said. “People need to think of broadband in the same way as water and electricity. It’s a commodity that can go to waste if you’re not careful.”

Most issues can be solved quickly and easily by customers themselves, with help from TalkTalk Speed Checker, otherwise TalkTalk BrightSparks can help.

TalkTalk customers should use speed checker to see if they qualify for a free visit from a Bright Sparks engineer otherwise book a Speed Optimisation visit for just £50.

 

Check the latest TalkTalk broadband deals here.

 

 

 

Arrests in Japan over mobile porn virus

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Six men have been arrested in Tokyo for creating a virus that targeted users of Android mobile phones.

The malicious program masqueraded as an application for watching videos and was made available via a porn site.

The downloaded app did not show video but instead flashed up a demand for a payment of 99,800 yen (£805) every five minutes.

Japanese police said the men were believed to have made more than 20m yen (£161,158) from the scam.

The six men created the porn site, seeded it with video content and then added the booby-trapped Android app, said police.

Almost 10,000 people downloaded the video-viewing virus, said Japanese police, but only 211 handed over cash.

Those who did not pay also suffered, said police, because once installed the virus stole contact and personal information from phones.

Two of those arrested were currently senior managers in hi-tech firms in Japan, police said.

The case is believed to be the first in Japan that involves a virus written specifically for smartphones.

Many security firms warn smartphone owners to avoid third-party sites that offer free apps as these are more likely to be have malicious code hidden within them.

Android has rapidly become popular with virus writers that target mobiles, said Trend Micro. Earlier this year it predicted that by the end of 2012 there could be more than 120,000 malicious Android apps in circulation.

Arrests in Japan over mobile porn virus

Six men have been arrested in Tokyo for creating a virus that targeted users of Android mobile phones. The malicious program masqueraded as an application for watching videos and was made available via a porn site.

 
The downloaded app did not show video but instead flashed up a demand for a payment of 99,800 yen (£805) every five minutes. Japanese police said the men were believed to have made more than 20m yen (£161,158) from the scam.
 
The six men created the porn site, seeded it with video content and then added the booby-trapped Android app, said police. Almost 10,000 people downloaded the video-viewing virus, said Japanese police, but only 211 handed over cash.
 
Those who did not pay also suffered, said police, because once installed the virus stole contact and personal information from phones.
 
Two of those arrested were currently senior managers in hi-tech firms in Japan, police said. The case is believed to be the first in Japan that involves a virus written specifically for smartphones.
 
Many security firms warn smartphone owners to avoid third-party sites that offer free apps as these are more likely to be have malicious code hidden within them.
 
Android has rapidly become popular with virus writers that target mobiles, said Trend Micro. Earlier this year it predicted that by the end of 2012 there could be more than 120,000 malicious Android apps in circulation .
 

Three opens up the internet in the EU

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New Euro Internet Pass makes the fear of using data on your smartphone in the EU a thing of the past.

 
From today, Three pay monthly phone customers will be able to enjoy the benefits of the internet on their smartphones whilst holidaying in the EU without the fear of running up a massive bill. 
 
For just a fiver a day, customers can tweet, tag, browse, book, update, upload, search, send, and Google as much as they want without worrying about how much they’re spending. 
 
So, if you’re trying to find that perfect pizzeria, you can just Google it and track it down on a map. If you can’t remember the word for donkey in Spanish, download a translation app. Or, if you really can’t resist finding out what’s going on at work, you can pick up your emails whenever you like and wherever you are. But best of all, you can make everyone back home insanely jealous with loads of gloaty “look where I am right now” type status updates and photos.
 
Thomas Malleschitz, marketing director at Three said, “We love the mobile internet at Three and we want our customers to enjoy it on holiday as much as they do at home. The Euro Internet Pass gives our customers the freedom to use the internet in the EU without having to think about how many megabytes or gigabytes they are using or where the nearest Wi-Fi hotspot is.
 
“We’ve been campaigning for lower data roaming rates and welcome the new regulation from Europe. These changes promote competition and allow us to offer our customers a better deal so they no longer have to worry about running up a massive bill when using the internet”. 

 

 

  

Check the availability and latest deals for Three here

 

  

 

Change data roaming settings

 With modern phones, especially smart phones, they will have a frequent connection to the Internet running almost the entire time due to the applications that run on your phone. This is great when you are out and about in the UK. If you are going abroad however, your phone still thinks it should go online for it’s information.
 
With modern phones, especially smart phones, they will have a frequent connection to the Internet running almost the entire time due to the applications that run on your phone. This is great when you are out and about in the UK. If you are going abroad however, your phone still thinks it should go online for it’s information.
 
Unless you change the settings on your phone, you could end up paying for roaming data charges, which can build up to quite a high bill. The following is a set of useful guidelines to make sure you make the most economical use of your smart phone abroad, without running up a high bill!
 
Wi Fi:
 
WiFi hotspots can be found all around the globe, and as long as your phone can connect to WiFi, you can connect to these zones. Most of which are free, but please check with the individual supplier if you are unsure.
 
WiFi hotspots are a great way to keep connected whilst abroad, and using your WiFi does not incur roaming charges, and often provide a very fast and reliable connection. Make sure your phone knows to use WiFi instead of the network otherwise you’re still charged.
 
If you are connecting to the Internet via your phone’s 3G signal abroad, this will be using your network providers roaming partners network, and as such this will incur roaming charges. If you do not wish to connect to the Internet, you will need to disable your phone’s Internet connectivity whilst abroad, and this should stop you incurring any roaming charges for data.
 
There are several ways to do this, and depending on your operating system and handset, the method will vary. Here is a step-by-step guide to disable Internet access on the most popular operating systems:
  
Android:
 
Go onto the main setting menu
Select Wireless and Networks tab
From here you can either select ‘Airplane Mode’ which disables all wireless connections, or select Mobile Network Settings
Select Data Roaming to off
 
Symbian:
 
There is no current method of disabling roaming data usage on Symbian (note, this does not include Symbian 3)
 
iPhone:
 
Select the Settings icon
Select the General tab
Select Networks
Select Data Roaming off
  
Blackberry:
 
Press the Blackberry button to go to the main menu
Go down to Manage Connections
Select Mobile Network Options
Select Data Services to Off
 
Palm:
 
Select the Call icon
Select the Network tab in the top left hand corner
Select Preferences
Scroll down to the bottom of the screen, and select disable Data Roaming
 
Bada:
 
Go onto the main menu
Select Settings
Select Connectivity
Select Data Roaming, and switch to off
 
Windows Mobile:
 
Press Windows button to go to main menu
Select Wireless Controls
Select Data Connection to off
 
*Please note, if you use an App that connects to the Internet, this will turn your connection back on. You can also download a free app that will keep these switched off from http://www.pocketpc-live.com/pocket-pc/turn-off-data-connections-while-roaming.html
  
Brew:
 
Unlock the handset
Go to Settings
Select Network Settings
Select Data Roaming to off
 
Please note, your handset will have to be set up to be used abroad. The alternative to putting your phone onto Airplane mode is to contact your network provider, and they can disable connections on your phone whilst abroad. This is a great solution for Symbian users who are worried about incurring charges.
 
If you are unsure which operating system your phone operates on, please visit your manufacturers website, where it will list all of the details of your chosen handset.