Troubleshooting your tablet

Many tablets are  assumed to be faulty, when in fact they only required simple fixes that you can easily make yourself.
If your device won’t turn on:
Plug it into the main and charge it. Batteries can go flat unexpectedly or after a few days of no use, so always make sure you try and charge your device if it won’t boot.
 If your tablet won’t charge:
Sometimes the battery can get so low that it takes time for the tablet to recognise it is being charged. If after 16 minutes your tablet isn’t charging, try a different charger. Always ensure you use a charger that is designed for your tablet, as some chargers are lower powered and may not charge your tablet correctly
If apps have disappeared:
This could be because you’ve recently installed a software update that’s incompatible with the app. To fix this remove the app and reinstall it (if it was a paid app, you won’t need to pay again – your personal details are registered with your app store account).
 If your screen orientation is the wrong way round:
For a number of tablets, when you hold them lengthways or widthways, what’s on screen will move with you. If you find this isn’t working as it should, it could be the app you’re using. Certain apps aren’t built to move with different screen orientations. Identify whether it’s the app by closing it and doing something different on your tablet.
If your tablet enters sleep mode when you’re using it:
This can be because the battery is too low to function (so plug it into the mains) or because it’s overheated. If you can, take a break from your tablet, however, if you’re in the middle of something ensure it’s placed on a hard flat surface and that the fan elements are not obstructed.
If you’ve got water in your tablet:
Even if there doesn’t appear to be any damage to your tablet, you should still turn it off and, if possible, take out the battery. Then leave the components in an air tight container with uncooked rice for a couple of days.
If your tablet won’t connect to your wireless network:
Make sure that the network you’re trying to connect to is your own and that you had the right password. Often the network name and password is written on the underside of your Wi-Fi modem or router.
If your battery’s draining too quickly:
Turn off Adobe Flash add-ons. If they’re set to ‘Always on’, this uses up a lot of battery. Ensure that any connections you’re not using are turned off – Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and GPS.
Prevent your tablet from being damaged:
1) When transferring data from your tablet to a memory card, don’t allow your tablet to go into sleep mode before the transfer is complete. To do so might cause damage to your data.
2) If your tablet has a screen, never pick it by this, support it underneath. Additionally don’t allow the screen to fall too far backwards.
3) Don’t leave your mobile phone near your device.
4) Don’t keep your tablet constantly plugged into the mains. It’s better for the battery if you allow your tablet to use up all of its conserved power, before plugging it in.

Automated marketing calls

Not every marketing call involves a call centre trying to push a product – sometimes you just hear a recorded message. 
 
Not every marketing call involves a call centre trying to push a product – sometimes you just hear a recorded message. These messages may claim that you’re due compensation, perhaps for a personal accident or for a mis-sold insurance policy, or may simply be trying to market a product or service to you.
 
This guide explains more about recorded message marketing calls and what you can do to stop them.
 
***If the message did not contain any marketing but was an information message from a company saying it had tried to call you but no operators were free to take the call, this is known as an abandoned call. You can learn more by looking at the guide on abandoned and silent calls. ***
  
Why do organisations make these calls?
 
These calls can have many purposes. For example: Claims management – these mainly concern personal injury claims and claims for the mis-selling of payment protection insurance (PPI) or Debt management – these messages offer various types of debt management services.
 
Organisations make these calls to generate ‘leads’ which they then sell on to firms who offer the service provided in the message.  In the case of personal injury claims, the leads would essentially be a list of people interested in claiming compensation for a personal injury. This list is then sold on to a firm which manages personal injury claims. It will contact the people on the list and offer them its services in dealing with possible claims.
 
These calls may ask you to press a number to speak to a live agent. You can of course choose to put the phone down. However, if you receive an automated marketing message and choose to press a key to speak to someone you will not be charged for the call.
 
If a phone number was provided with the call, our advice would be to refrain from calling it, unless you are familiar with the firm trying to contact you. If you do decide to call the number the call charges will depend on several factors, such as the number called and whether you call from your landline or mobile phone, as set out in our guide on call costs.
 
What is the law?
 
Companies or organisations making automated marketing calls must have your permission before they call you.
  
What can I do about these calls?
  
If you are receiving automated marketing calls and have not given prior permission, you can complain to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), which is responsible for enforcing regulations in this area.
 
Why complain?
 
Your complaint can provide real benefits, both for you as an individual and for consumers generally. This is because complaints play a vital role in helping regulators tackle the companies responsible for nuisance calls and messages. Without your complaints regulators would find it much harder to indentify and take action against those responsible.
 
Although complaining may not put a complete or immediate stop to all your nuisance calls or messages, it does help regulators take more targeted action in this area. Making a complaint is simple. You can do it online, by phone or by post, and it can take as little as 5 minutes.
 
Try to provide the ICO with as much information about the call as possible, in particular:
 
the organisation which transmitted the recorded message;
the number that the call came from;
the date and time of the call; and
the nature of the sales/marketing that occurred during the call.
 
Complain to the ICO
 
You can complain to the ICO by:
ringing their helpline: 0303 123 1113
online:
or by post: Information Commissioner’s Office, Wycliffe House, Water Lane, Wilmslow, Cheshire, SK9 5AF
 
Even if you don’t know who called you, the ICO is still interested in hearing from you
 
Scams
 
You should be aware of scam calls, such as those asking you to send money upfront or buy something up-front before you get the prize or offer, asking you to make expensive phone calls to get the prize or offer, or asking for your bank details or other personal information.
 
For up-to-date information and advice on the latest scams you should contact Action Fraud – the UK’s national fraud reporting centre. For more information, please visit their website
 
What if the calls are from overseas?
 
Firms based overseas who call on behalf of UK-based organisations should still comply with UK law. If you are receiving automated marketing calls from abroad on behalf of a UK-based organisation you should follow the guidance given above.
 

Abandoned and silent calls

The phone rings, you rush to answer but there’s no-one on the line. Abandoned and silent calls can be annoying and irritating at the best of times. But for some people – for example, those living alone – these calls can be particularly frightening.
This guide explains more about these calls, what can cause them and what you can do about them.
What are abandoned and silent calls?
An abandoned call is one that is terminated when you pick up the receiver. Instead of a person on the other end of the line you hear an information message from the organisation that is trying to call you. A silent call is where you receive a call but you can hear nothing and have no means of knowing whether anyone is at the other end of the line.
 What causes them?
Most abandoned and silent calls are not necessarily made deliberately but can be caused by the use of technology by organisations to maximise the amount of time their calling agents spend speaking to consumers. The majority of abandoned calls are caused by automated calling systems known as diallers.
These diallers, mainly used in call centres, dial telephone numbers automatically and connect people to call centre agents as soon as the phone is answered. But diallers may not always work as intended. For example, if the dialler makes a call but there is no call centre agent on hand to deal with it, you might receive an abandoned call.
Silent calls can occur, for example, when the technology used by call centres to detect answer-machines mistakes you answering for an answering machine, and cuts off the call without playing an information message, or you hearing anything.
What is the law in this area?
Ofcom tackles abandoned and silent calls and has published a policy statement for industry aimed at reducing the harm caused by these calls. Where someone is repeatedly making abandoned and/or silent calls, Ofcom may take enforcement action, including fining the caller up to £2 million.
Why complain?
Your complaint can provide real benefits, both for you as an individual and for consumers generally. This is because complaints play a vital role in helping regulators tackle the companies responsible for nuisance calls and messages.
Without your complaints regulators would find it much harder to identify and take action against those responsible. Although complaining may not put a complete or immediate stop to all your nuisance calls or messages, it does help regulators take more targeted action in this area.
Making a complaint is simple. You can do it online, by phone or by post, and it can take as little as 5 minutes. Ofcom continually monitors complaints about abandoned and silent calls and can launch an investigation if it believes a caller is not following the law.
I’m receiving silent/abandoned calls – what can I do?
If you are receiving abandoned or silent calls we recommend taking the following action:
Try and identify the caller: All companies using automated diallers should present a Calling Line Identification number on your telephone’s display, and allow you to obtain the caller’s telephone number by dialling 1471.
Alternatively, the automated message from an abandoned call should disclose the name of the organisation and provide a number that you can call to opt-out of receiving further calls.
Complain to Ofcom
You can complain by:
Ringing our Consumer Contact Team on 0300 123 3333
Going online
or by post: Ofcom, Riverside House, 2a Southwark Bridge Road, London, SE1 9HA
You should try to provide as much information as you can about the abandoned or silent call, including:
• the name and number of the caller;
• how many times you have been called by the same number; and
• over what period of time have you been receiving the calls.
If you are unable to identify the caller you should contact your phone company. Most phone companies have a nuisance calls team, who can give you advice on what to do next.