How to save Netflix shows to microSD card

Netflix members worldwide can now download in addition to stream great series and films at no extra cost.
 
Netflix members worldwide can now download in addition to stream great series and films at no extra cost.
 
While many members enjoy watching Netflix at home, we’ve often heard they also want to continue their Stranger Things binge while on airplanes and other places where Internet is expensive or limited. Just click the download button on the details page for a film or TV series and you can watch it later without an internet connection.
 
Many of your favorite streaming series and movies are already available for download, with more on the way, so there is plenty of content available for those times when you are offline. For example, Orange is The New Black, Narcos and The Crown are available for download today.
 
The new feature is included in all plans and available for phones and tablets on Android and iOS. To start downloading today, update your Netflix app to the most recent version and take us with you to enjoy Netflix everywhere you go. 

 
If you’re an Android user, and you’ve downloaded the most recent version of the Netflix app, you’ll be able to store series’ and films on your microSD card, as well as your device’s internal storage.
 
Offline content does still expire after a certain amount of time, so you won’t be able to keep it forever, but if you’re looking to binge an entire series on a long-haul flight, for example, it’s now possible.
 
This is how you do it: Open the Netflix app, and head to the menu button – top left
 
1. App Settings
2. Download location
3. SD card
4. Find shows to download, and enjoy
 
How much space do you need? Some Android smartphones can take larger microSD cards than others. Some can accept a card of up 256GB capacity, which is absolutely loads of room. But realistically, what you’d need to store your favourite series is something around 8GB.
 
 
 
 
 

Virgin flight delayed by Galaxy Note wi-fi hoax

A flight in America was delayed and almost diverted on Tuesday after a passenger changed the name of their wi-fi device to ‘Samsung Galaxy Note 7’.
 
A flight in America was delayed and almost diverted on Tuesday after a passenger changed the name of their wi-fi device to ‘Samsung Galaxy Note 7’.
 
Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phones were banned from planes by the US Department of Transportation after several of the devices caught fire. Lucas Wojciechowski was on Virgin America flight 358 from San Francisco to Boston and told BBC News he photographed the hotspot after noticing it when he opened his laptop. A call went out for any passenger with a Note 7 to press their call button.
 
Mr. Wojciechowski subsequently tweeted the crew’s announcements from the late night flight after the pilot warned passengers they would have to make an emergency landing. “This isn’t a joke. We’re going to turn on the lights (it’s 11pm) and search everyone’s bag until we find it. This is the captain speaking. Apparently the plane is going to have to get diverted and searched if nobody fesses up soon.”
 
The owner came forward confessing there was no Samsung Galaxy Note 7 on board, but they had changed the name of their SSID wireless device to ‘Samsung Galaxy Note 7_1097.’

 
According to Mr. Wojciechowski, the flight crew later announced: “Ladies and gentlemen, we found the device. Luckily only the name of the device was changed to ‘Galaxy Note 7’. It was not a GN7.”
 
Serenity Caldwell, managing editor of Apple products news and reviews site iMore, was on the ground where the plane was landing and had arrived early to board her flight. She posted a series of tweets when she arrived at her gate. “When I got to the airport (early) today, I found a huge line of people at the counter to my gate. Turns out, the flight had been cancelled. It took about two hours for everyone to get their itineraries finally sorted. Finally, they all move on to their new gates and our crew comes. They’re hanging out while we wait to begin boarding, and one of them lets this slip: “Know why the 9am flight got cancelled? The plane was mid-flight when an attendant noticed a wi-fi hotspot. A Galaxy Note 7 wi-fi hotspot. Everyone else makes a horrified face.”
 
Mr. Wojciechowski said he believed no further action was taken on the passenger with the device.
 
 

Broadband boost for remotest parts of UK

The government has said £440m has been found so about 600,000 more premises can gain access to superfast broadband.
 
The government has said £440m has been found so about 600,000 more premises can gain access to superfast broadband.
 
The cash comes from “efficiency savings” and money returned by BT as part of the government’s flagship broadband rollout scheme. Culture Secretary Karen Bradley said the funds would help to bring faster speeds to homes and businesses in some of the most remote parts of the UK. Experts said it was not all “new money” but would still be welcomed.
 
The cash will be made up of £150m in cost savings and the rest in the form of returned subsidies from BT, the government said. Under a 2010 deal, the government paid BT to roll out superfast broadband in hard-to-reach areas where providers had said it was not cost-effective to install broadband infrastructure. As part of the agreement, if more than 20% of premises in those areas bought superfast broadband, BT had to repay some of the subsidy. On average, the take-up has been 30.6%, leading to a forecast repayment of £292m, the Department for Culture, Media and Sport said.
 
The extra funds will be spent in all areas of the country through the Broadband Delivery UK scheme. Ministers set up the programme so that by the end of next year, 95% of UK premises would be able to buy superfast broadband – defined as 24Mbps. Such speeds enable families to stream TV on multiple devices at the same time. The extra funds are designed to reach the remaining 5% of the UK and improve speeds where coverage is patchy.
 
Kim Mears, the managing director for infrastructure delivery at BT’s Openreach division, said that there was “still more to be done” to improve broadband speeds in some rural areas. However, she added that 4.5 million rural homes had already benefited from BT’s efforts and that the company was “absolutely determined to look at how we go further and faster”.
 
The company has faced criticism for the speed of the rollout and the quality of the broadband coverage. However, the government and BT said it was a “win-win” in that more households were taking it up, triggering clawback payments that would help other premises access faster broadband speeds.
 
“We’re delighted that the success and efficiency of our delivery will mean hundreds of thousands more homes and business could get faster broadband than originally expected,” a BT spokesman said.
 
The government has not set a timeline for when the 600,000 premises will benefit. It comes after Chancellor Philip Hammond announced £1.14bn in government funds in last month’s Autumn Statement to improve fibre broadband and develop 5G.
 
 

BT tops UK broadband complaints list

BT’s broadband services received the most complaints during the third quarter of 2016, show figures from regulator Ofcom.

  
BT’s broadband services received the most complaints during the third quarter of 2016, show figures from regulator Ofcom.
 
It received 36 complaints for every 100,000 broadband customers – higher than the industry average of 20. BT-owned companies, Plusnet and EE, came second and third in the broadband complaints table.
Vodafone had 18 complaints for every 100,000 of its mobile customers – three times the industry average of six. As well as doing poorly on broadband, Plusnet and EE also received the most complaints about their fixed telephone services.
 
The rankings come soon after BT chairman Sir Michael Rake said it had more work to do to improve customer service. “We apologise to customers we’ve let down,” said BT in a statement. “BT cares about the service it gives to customers and we know we need to do better.” It added that some “exceptional” broadband outages during the third quarter contributed to the rise in complaints.
 
Bt said it was putting cash into service improvements and recruiting widely to bolster the number of staff who handle queries and complaints, The software it uses to handle complaints was also getting an overhaul, it added. “Customers will see an improvement as these initiatives take effect,” it said.
 
The quarterly Ofcom study looks at the number of complaints lodged about landlines, broadband, mobiles and Pay TV services. The complaints cover issues such as faults, billing and pricing as well as problems with services and how well they are set up by firms. They also include the ways telecoms firms deal with grievances.
 
Ofcom said it had seen an increase in complaints about broadband and landline services between July and September. “We won’t stand for complacency when it comes to customer service,” said Lindsey Fussell, director of Ofcom’s consumer group in a statement. “We expect providers to make it a top priority and work hard to better serve their customers.”
 
Ofcom said it gathered data on complaints to help monitor how well companies were serving customers and to provide useful information for people who were looking to switch suppliers or sign up for new services.
 
Ms Fussell said it investigated when customers were let down and had the power to levy significant fines. In October, Vodafone was hit with a £4.6m fine by Ofcom for breaking rules on handling complaints and misleading customers on what they received when they signed up for pay-as-you-go services. Last year, a £1m fine was levied on EE for not doing enough to tell people their rights when they made a complaint.
 
 

Facebook accused over WhatsApp takeover

Facebook has been accused by the European Commission of misleading it during its investigation of the company’s 2014 takeover of WhatsApp.

 
Facebook has been accused by the European Commission of misleading it during its investigation of the company’s 2014 takeover of WhatsApp.
 
The Commission says it was misled when Facebook said it was impossible to match users’ Facebook and WhatsApp accounts. But in August, WhatsApp said it would do just that, by linking users’ phone numbers with their Facebook identities. Facebook said it had nothing to hide and had acted in good faith.
 
The Commission believes the ability to link the accounts of the two services’ users must have existed in 2014, though this is vigorously disputed by Facebook. If the Commission concludes that it was definitely misled, either by accident or design, it could fine Facebook up to 1% of its turnover, which would amount to hundreds of millions of euros.
 
“Companies are obliged to give the Commission accurate information during merger investigations,” said Commissioner Margrethe Vestager, who is in charge of competition policy, “In this specific case, the Commission’s preliminary view is that Facebook gave us incorrect or misleading information during the investigation into its acquisition of WhatsApp.”
 
Facebook is being asked to respond by 31 January 2017. For its part, it says that it was only very early this year that it found a way to establish a link with the accounts of WhatsApp users, via their phone numbers. And even so, Facebook says in fact it still cannot match accounts with the precision needed for full “cross-platform messaging”, which it argues was the Commission’s main concern back in 2014.
 
“We’ve consistently provided accurate information about our technical capabilities and plans, including in submissions about the WhatsApp acquisition and in voluntary briefings before WhatsApp’s privacy policy update this year,” said a Facebook spokesman. “We’re pleased that the Commission stands by its clearance decision, and we will continue to cooperate and share information officials need to resolve their questions,” he added.
 
The Commission said its new probe would not undermine its previous decision to approve the $19bn (£16bn) merger of the two companies because it had not relied on the misleading information alone to approve the deal.
 
When WhatsApp announced its new policy in August, it justified it by saying this would lead to an improved service, such as providing “more relevant” friend suggestions, letting businesses send adverts directly to users, and also by dealing more effectively with spam and abuse. But the change has come under scrutiny from regulators across Europe. The day after the new policy was announced, the UK’s Information Commissioner (ICO) launched an immediate investigation to see if the alteration broke the UK’s data protection laws.
 
In September, the Hamburg Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information told Facebook to stop collecting and storing the data of German users of WhatsApp. Then in November the UK’s Information Commissioner followed suit and told Facebook not to use the data it had gathered from its WhatsApp users in the UK, saying the firm had not obtained valid consent for the move.
 
Meanwhile European data regulators in October also asked the two tech companies to stop sharing data while the new policy was scrutinised.
 
 

Cuba announces home internet trial scheme in Havana

The Cuban government has announced a two-month trial scheme to allow internet access in private homes.
  
The Cuban government has announced a two-month trial scheme to allow internet access in private homes.
 
State-run telecommunications company Etecsa will install internet in some 2,000 homes in the capital’s colonial district, Old Havana. The company has also reduced by 25% the fee charged to connect to the web, which most Cubans can only access from public wi-fi hotspots. Cuba has one of the lowest online connectivity rates in the world.
 
Many Cubans hope the country’s communist government will eventually expand the scheme. Details are scarce, but the authorities say the experiment will be extended if it is approved after the two-month trial period.
 
Last week, Etecsa signed an agreement with Google to provide faster access to content including Gmail and YouTube. Google will install local servers that will speed up connection to its services. Much of the island’s internet infrastructure is obsolete.
 
Google and Etecsa reached agreement in the final weeks of Barack Obama’s presidency, but it is not clear whether his successor, Donald Trump, will change US policies towards Cuba.
 
 

Mobile phones could become virtually useless in cars

In the future you may not be able to use a mobile phone in a moving car.
  
In the future you may not be able to use a mobile phone in a moving car.
 
The Department for Transport is considering new technology that will block a mobile signal in a moving vehicle. The software will also prevent users from being able to retrieve texts and emails.
 
The DfT is aiming to sit down with network providers and handset manufactures in the new year to discuss the technology further.
 
‘We are determined to crack down on mobile phone use at the wheel,’ a DfT spokesperson said. 

‘Our plans to double penalties for this serious crime should act as an incredibly strong deterrent. 

We will continue to explore what more can be done to tackle this crime.’

 
The government has already cracked down on mobile phone use in cars by introducing tougher penalties for anyone who uses their phone behind the wheel. This includes automatic bans for new drivers, a fine of £200 and six penalty points. And if the offence results in a death then a driver can be jailed for life.
 
 
 
 
 

Apple will charge £65 to replace one lost Airpod

Apple has said customers who lose one of the new wireless Airpod earphones will be charged £65 for a replacement.
  
Apple has said customers who lose one of the new wireless Airpod earphones will be charged £65 for a replacement.
 
The devices went on sale via Apple’s website this week and a pair costs £159 in the UK. They are sold with a charging case and connect to Apple devices such as iPhones and Macs via Bluetooth.
 
One tech analyst said the Airpods would be “easier to lose” than conventional, wired earphones but pointed out that the design also had some advantages. Customers will also be charged £65 to replace a lost charging case. It costs £45 to service the battery in a single Airpod or the charging case itself.
 
It is not surprising that replacing a lost product would incur a charge, noted IHS Technology analyst Ian Fogg. “What’s striking I think about this is more that, because the Airpod is so small and doesn’t have a cable, it’s going to be easier to lose,” he said. 
 
He added that one benefit of wireless, miniaturised devices like the Airpods was the fact that connecting wires would not snag on clothing, for example. But it might be possible to develop features for wireless earphones in the future that would help users find a lost Airpod and avoid having to pay for a replacement. “Apple could have a ‘find-my-Airpod’ feature,” suggested Mr Fogg.
 
 

Decent broadband ‘denied’ to millions in UK

More than 1.4 million homes in the UK cannot get decent broadband, a report from telecoms regulator Ofcom reveals.
  
More than 1.4 million homes in the UK cannot get decent broadband, a report from telecoms regulator Ofcom reveals.
 
But the number of homes that cannot get a service of 10 megabits per second (mbps) or higher has fallen by one million in the last year, it found. The report looks at how the UK’s mix of fixed and wireless communication networks are developing. Ofcom said despite the fall, “much more” had to be done to improve the UK’s communications infrastructure.
 
“Mobile and broadband coverage continued to grow this year, but too many people and businesses are still struggling for a good service,” said Steve Unger, Ofcom’s director of strategy, in a statement. “We think that is unacceptable.”
 
Ofcom’s report found a significant urban-rural divide on higher speed broadband. About 25% of properties in rural areas, more than 900,000 homes, are too far from telephone exchanges to get a 10mbps service. This speed is now necessary to meet the needs of typical households, it said. Estimates by Ofcom suggest it would take £1.1bn to boost networks in remote areas so they run as fast as the “decent” 10mbps networks in towns and cities.
 
The report noted that one-third of UK homes, 9.1 million, have signed up for superfast services – designated as 30mbps or higher. Ofcom said the UK’s mobile networks also needed to tackle areas where coverage fell short.  ts report estimates that only 40% of the UK’s landmass can get 4G mobile signals from all four operators. This was an improvement on 2015, when only 8% enjoyed that “total” coverage, it said.
 
Ofcom is now talking to network operators about “radical and ambitious” ways to fill the “not-spots” and to boost speeds.
 
The Ofcom report is published soon after a separate report from the UK’s National Infrastructure Commission called mobile coverage on trains and motorways “appalling”. It found that the UK’s 4G network currently ranks 54th in the world in terms of coverage.
 
 

Sky and 21st Century Fox agree £18.5bn takeover deal

Broadcaster Sky and 21st Century Fox have reached agreement on the terms of a takeover deal.
  
Broadcaster Sky and 21st Century Fox have reached agreement on the terms of a takeover deal.
 
Rupert Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox will pay £11.7bn for the 61% stake it does not already own. Sky shareholders will receive £10.75 in cash for each share, valuing the entire company at £18.5bn. The deal comes amid concerns that Rupert Murdoch, who also owns the Sun and the Times newspapers, will have excessive influence over UK media.
 
Karen Bradley, the Culture Secretary, will have 10 days to decide whether the Fox bid raises public interest concerns – in this case media plurality. She has the power to ask Ofcom, the media watchdog, to examine the deal.
 
Tom Watson, shadow culture secretary, urged Ms Bradley to refer the deal to Ofcom: “When she stood on the steps of Downing Street this summer, the prime minister said to the people of this country that ‘when we take the big calls, we’ll think not of the powerful, but you. This is a big call. The government needs to decide whose side it’s on.”
 
A number of Sky shareholders, including Standard Life Investments and Jupiter Asset Management, have questioned the independence of the non executive directors and their ability to extract a higher price since a possible bid was announced last Friday.
 
Richard Marwood, senior fund manager at Royal London Asset Management, owner of a 0.36% stake in Sky, said on Thursday: “We would urge the independent committee of Sky directors, who recommended that shareholders accept the offer, to share more information on the independent financial advice that they based their agreement on. Such disclosure would help shareholders assess the fairness of the offer and give greater confidence in the independence of the committee in the bid process.”
 
James Murdoch, Rupert Murdoch’s son, is both chairman of Sky and chief executive of Fox.
 
Sky deputy chairman Martin Gilbert, who is also chief executive of Aberdeen Asset Management, which owns a 0.39% stake in the broadcaster, said: “[We] believe 21st Century Fox’s offer at a 40 per cent premium to the undisturbed share price will accelerate and de-risk the delivery of future value for all Sky shareholders. As a result, the independent committee unanimously agreed that we have a proposal that we can put to Sky shareholders and recommend.”
 
Chase Carey, the former chief executive of Fox Television and the current co-chief operating officer of 21st Century Fox, is a non-executive director at Sky. While John Nallen, the chief financial officer of 21st Century Fox, is also a non-executive director at Sky.
 
21st Century Fox plans to buy the remaining stake in Sky through a scheme of arrangement, which means it needs the approval of investors holding 75% of the shares. Sky has 22 million customers in the UK, Ireland, Italy, Germany and Austria. Mr Murdoch’s son James is both chairman of Sky and chief executive of Fox. In 2011, Rupert Murdoch abandoned a bid to take full control of Sky in the wake of the phone hacking scandal.