Whatsapp Scam doing the rounds be aware​!

There is a WhatsApp scam doing the rounds that has already seen people behind the scam make millions.
 
There is a WhatsApp scam doing the rounds that has already seen people behind the scam make millions.
 
The Scam tells Whatsapp users that they are going to have to start paying for the service. It’s demanded that they must then pay 99p to continue using the app, The scam is playing on the fact that when Whatsapp first launched you were required to pay a 99p fee to continue using the app after 12 months.
 
This is not the case and the app is completely free for all users now, Don’t fall victim to the scam.
 
Once you’ve made a payment of 99p they have your bank details and quickly ​start bleeding your accounts dry. The people​ behind the scam have obtained a list of UK telephone numbers and have been sending out messages to the users with a high success rate of people paying the 99p.
 

 
The message states: “Your subscription has expired. To verify your account and purchase a lifetime subscription for just 0.99 GDP simply tap on this link…”
 
Your best bet is to delete the message as soon as it arrives and to run antivirus software if you have clicked the link.
 
 

Most US homes have mobiles but no landline

Less than half of US households now have a landline, according to a study from the US government.
  
Less than half of US households now have a landline, according to a study from the US government.
 
Of the households surveyed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 50.8% of homes had at least one mobile phone but no landline. A further 3.3% of homes surveyed had neither a mobile phone nor a landline. The CDC found that mobile-only households had become the majority during its twice-yearly survey into the health and habits of Americans. 
 
Participants in the National Health Interview Survey are asked to provide a residential phone number in case the CDC needs to contact them again.
 
In 2003, it started to ask participating households whether they had “at least one phone inside [the] home that is currently working and is not a cell phone”. Its preliminary data for the second half of 2016 suggests that only 45.9% of households had a landline. The CDC does not explore the reasons why participants do not have a fixed phone line, if that is the case. Instead, it uses the data to help ensure it is interviewing a representative sample of the US population.
 
The CDC says that the number of households without a landline has risen by 2.5% since the same period in 2015. It suggests that more than 123 million adults (50.5%) and more than 44 million children (60.7%) live in households with at least one mobile phone but no landline.
 
More than 70% of adults aged 25-34 were found to live in mobile-only homes, while almost 84% of households made up of unrelated adults had no fixed phone line. Renters, adults deemed to be living in poverty or near-poverty, and Hispanic adults were also found to be more likely to live in mobile-only households.
 
In the UK, the proportion of mobile-only households is much lower. Figures from the telecoms and communications watchdog, Ofcom, show that at the start of 2017, just 18% of UK households were mobile-only.
 
The reason, it says, is that despite a steady decline in the quantity of calls made and received via a landline, most homes still need one in order to get fixed line broadband. Many in the US can get their broadband and TV via a cable provider instead, which removes the need for a traditional phone line.
 
 

Apple’s iPhone sales in surprise drop

Apple sold fewer iPhones than a year ago in the first three months of 2017, the company said in its latest results.
 
Apple sold fewer iPhones than a year ago in the first three months of 2017, the company said in its latest results.
 
The California firm, which is due to release a new phone later this year, said it sold 50.8 million iPhones in the period, down 1% year-on-year. Apple boss Tim Cook blamed a “pause” as customers wait for the next iPhone.
 
Shares in the firm fell nearly 2% in after-hours trading after earlier hitting a record high on expectations of better results. Apple reported a 4.6% rise in revenue across the whole company to $52.9bn (£41bn), slightly below analysts’ forecasts.
The dip in iPhone sales was offset by services, including Apple Pay, iCloud and the App store, which recorded an 18% increase in sales to $7bn.
 
Mr Cook also pointed to growth in sales of Apple Watch, as well as its AirPods and Beats earphones. Despite falling unit sales, revenue from iPhones still climbed 1% to $33.2bn due to “robust” sales of its bigger, more expensive iPhone 7 Plus.
 
 
 
 

UK’s best and worst cities for 4G mobile coverage revealed

Middlesbrough is the best place in the UK to get mobile 4G coverage while Bournemouth is the worst, says a report.
  
Middlesbrough is the best place in the UK to get mobile 4G coverage while Bournemouth is the worst, says a report.
 
Consumer group Which? and analyst OpenSignal measured data from mobile phones across 20 cities in the UK. They say “critical” reforms are needed to provide a better service for customers.
 
Ofcom said its rules meant “virtually all” UK premises would have to receive a 4G signal by the end of the year. The OpenSignal study analysed more than 500m data readings from mobile phones taken from more than 30,000 users between December 1 2016 and February 28 via an app. It ranked 20 of the biggest cities from top to bottom based on their 4G availability.
 
Top 5: Middlesbrough/Teesside – 82.7%, Sheffield – 79.3%, Sunderland – 79%, Leicester – 78.6%, Leeds/West Yorkshire – 78.2%
 
Bottom 5: Bournemouth/Poole – 67.5%, Southampton/Portsmouth – 69.6%, Cardiff – 71.8%, Nottingham – 73.3%, London – 73.6%
 
The report also looked at average 4G download speeds across the UK, finding Stoke-on-Trent to be the fastest city and Brighton the slowest. Which? says big cities often suffer from sub-par mobile networks because it is more difficult to build towers and masts in built-up urban areas.
 
Which? is calling on the next government to work with Ofcom and mobile providers to ensure “critical reforms” are made to ensure a better performance and service for customers. Alex Neill, Which? managing director of home products and services, said Ofcom needed to “keep the pressure” on mobile operators so every part of the country got a “decent service”.
 
“Our mobile phone is central to how we live our lives and that is why it is so frustrating when we can’t access emails or browse the internet on the go,” she added.
 
Ofcom said it agreed mobile coverage must improve and that it understood the “importance” of having a reliable mobile broadband where people live and work. A spokeswoman said: “Ofcom rules mean that virtually all UK premises must receive a 4G signal by the end of this year. We’re also making available valuable new airwaves to boost mobile broadband, and have challenged mobile operators to explore how to reach all remote areas and transport lines.”